2018 Ford Focus review – fun, but no longer flawed, the Focus back to its best

It may not be quite as sharp as its predecessor, but the Ford filled in the gaps making for an impressive family hatchback

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Rating
star-4
Pro
Classic Focus ‘togetherness’ in the ride and handling, much better interior and ergonomics too
Con
Less clarity to the steering than the old model, odd styling

The Ford Focus has been a family hatch stalwart for over 20 years now, replacing the iconic Escort with the sharp-looking and sharp-to-drive hatch that took the class by storm. Four generations later, the all-new Focus may have the same mantra, but the market space it finds itself in has never been tougher.

To approach this, the Focus has been stretched in every direction of the hatchback genre, with entry cars joined by sporty ST-Line, luxury Vignale and even pseudo SUV Active models. A hot ST model will follow next summer, and eventually an RS too, but for now let’s focus on the standard car, no pun intended (got it out of the way there).

Prices, specs and rivals:

Prices start at $23,400 for the entry-level 1-litre petrol five-door hatch model with 84bhp, but it’s sparsely specced, not to mention a lot of car to move around with not a lot of power. An extra $450 will get you the friskier 99bhp model, and a further $640 will add another 25bhp to the total, taking it to 124bhp. The larger 1.5-litre, 150bhp and 184bhp options are also available further up the range, but aren’t available in entry Style or Zetec grades.

Upgrading from Style to Zetec will cost $1720 or so depending on the engine, adding alloy wheels, front fog lights, a heated windscreen, leather steering wheel, cruise control and that all-important dash top-mounted 8-inch touchscreen that keeps the interior from looking like a TV cabinet without a TV in it.

Categories: EVO

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